Why Evidence-Based? New Resource Hub Covers All

by Susan Richardson

NatalieMoving toward the next step in determining reliable practices that reduce youth crime, the National Juvenile Justice Network and the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange launched a new Evidence-Based Practices section of the Juvenile Justice Resource Hub. This news hub will no doubt become a toolkit for policy makers as evidence-based programs and models become more prevalent.

Why is evidence-based important?

Beyond the fact that evidence-based practices are scientifically evaluated and proven to be effective in reducing crime, they also carry long-term benefits that directly affect communities. According to the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange, distinct benefits include:

  • Improving public safety
  • Improved outcomes for youth and families
  • Saving money
  • Technical assistance
  • Community support

The new evidence-based resource offers information on key issues, reform trends, experts in the field and resources. As Reclaiming Futures implements evidence-based screening, assessment and treatment, we’re happy to see this new resource become widely available.

Read more and share this new valuable resource here.

Take our Reader Survey: Share your Thoughts and Enter to Win

by Donna Wiench

During my first year with Reclaiming Futures, I’ve enjoyed meeting the good-hearted, solution-oriented, practical yet hopeful people who make up the Reclaiming Futures community, offline and online.

Some of you are connected to Reclaiming Futures’ 39 sites in 18 states; others are interested in bringing Reclaiming Futures to your communities.  (If this is you, I’d like to talk with you, so please contact me by email at donna.wiench@pdx.edu).

What we talk about on our website and blog reflects our learnings from both the courts and the academic research world, and is intended to be informative, inspiring, and useful to you.  To ensure that we’re delivering valuable, relevant information, we thought we’d just ask for your opinion of our content.

That’s why we’re launching an online survey this month, designed to gather your thoughts about your engagement with Reclaiming Futures, and what you’d like to learn more about.

We are also offering an incentive to participants. If you complete the survey and provide your name and contact information, you’ll be entered into a drawing for a $50 Amazon card.   

We respect your time, so the survey is short.  Nine questions are all we have to learn about what you’re interested in reading.   Are you willing to lend a hand?  Please click here.

Thank you for your help and for working to Reclaim the Futures of our young people.

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

by LJ Hernandez

opportunityBelow you’ll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Webinars

Events

Jobs

Webinar: Co-Occurring Disorders within the System of Care, August 21

by Cora Crary

It is important for communities to be aware that youth presented with substance abuse issues are likely to also be dealing with mental health issues. Youth in the juvenile justice system are also likely to be faced with trauma issues, academic needs and other concerns.

To help communities better understand the challenges and approaches to treating youth with co-occurring behavioral health disorders, Reclaiming Futures, a TA Network Core Partner, will present a webinar on Co-Occurring Disorders within the System of Care on August 21.

Designing a Recovery-Oriented Care Model...The webinar, presented by Kari Collins and Michelle Kilgore, will share information on the complex needs of youth with co-occurring disorders and outline some important considerations when developing or enhancing a system of care so that it will better address their needs.

Included in the presentation will be an overview of a document called Designing a Recovery-Oriented Care Model for Adolescents and Transition Age Youth with Substance Use or Co-Occurring Mental Health Disorders that was published by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in 2009, following a consultative session with substance abuse and mental health treatment providers, family members and other experts.

Register here.

Mental Health Funding Cuts are Leaving Young People Abandoned; News Roundup

by Cecilia Bianco

News-oldTV-smlJuvenile Justice Reform

  • Juvenile Justice Care and Protection Bill 2014 Introduced in the Lok Sabha (India TV)
    After years of wait, the government has finally introduced the Juvenile Justice Care and protection Bill 2014 in the Lok Sabha today. This Act will give power to the Juvenile Justice Board to decide if juveniles between the ages of 16 – 18 should be tried as adults for crimes like murder and rape.
  • House members Appointed to Juvenile Justice Task Force (West Virginia Record)
    “West Virginia has the highest rate of 16-19 year-olds who are neither in school, nor in the labor force, while 30 percent of children under the age of six are living in poverty – the odds are stacked against them,” Delegate Stephen Skinner said. “We must provide effective case management, and expose at-risk youth to instruction and reinforcement for proactive, acceptable social behaviors.”

Jobs, Grants, Events and Webinars

  • Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Two-Part Webinar Series Identifies Principles to Reduce Recidivism

by Susan Richardson

Last week, we highlighted two new white papers that provide strategic recommendations for instigating systemic change to reduce recidivism among youth in the juvenile justice system. Next month, the National Reentry Resource Center, with funding from the U.S. Department of Justice, will host a two-part webinar series sharing highlights from these white papers.

Aimed at juvenile corrections leaders, probation officers, judicial staff, policymakers and other key stakeholders in the juvenile justice space, these webinars will provide quick summaries of what is working, along with tangible, actionable recommendations.National Reentry Resource Center

Webinar #1: Core Principles for Reducing Recidivism and Improving Other Outcomes for Youth in the Juvenile Justice Systems

Webinar #2: Measuring and Using Juvenile Recidivism Data to Inform Policy, Practice, and Resource Allocation

  • September 11, 2014 at 2-3:30 p.m. ET
  • Register here
  • “The second webinar summarizes the issue brief, “Measuring and Using Juvenile Recidivism Data to Inform Policy, Practice, and Resource Allocation,” and its five recommendations for improving juvenile justice systems’ approaches to the measurement, analysis, collection, reporting, and use of recidivism data. Participants will learn the essentials on measuring recidivism in an accurate and comprehensive way, and how to use such data to guide system decisions and hold agencies and providers accountable for results.”

Opportunity Board Roundup: Juvenile Justice Grants, Jobs, Webinars and Events

by LJ Hernandez

opportunityBelow you’ll find a selection of the latest grants, jobs, webinars and events posted to our Opportunity Board. Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Webinars

Events

Jobs

10 Twitter Accounts to Follow for Juvenile Justice News

by Cecilia Bianco

To stay up to date on juvenile justice news, consider using Twitter. There are several accounts twitter
that will keep you up to date on all the news and events you need to know about!

Here are ten of the best, most informative accounts for juvenile justice news:

  1. @JJIE: The Juvenile Justice Information Exchange is the only U.S publication that features daily coverage of juvenile justice and related issues around the nation.
  2. @JusticeforYouth: The Campaign for Youth Justice advocates for juvenile justice reform by providing support to federal, state, and local campaigns.
  3. @JusticeReform: The Justice Fellowship works to reform the criminal justice system so communities are safer, victims are respected and offenders are transformed.
  4. @JuvenileCrime: The Global Youth Justice Organization are “juvenile crime champions” that work to prevent the escalation of juvenile crime and incarceration rates around the world by advancing the global expansion of quality youth justice and juvenile justice diversions programs.
  5. @SentencingProj: The Sentencing Project has been working for a fair and effective U.S. criminal justice system since 1986.
  6. @JuvLaw1975: The Juvenile Law Center is a nonprofit law firm working nationally to shape and use the law on behalf of children in the child welfare and justice systems.
  7. @AntiRecidivism: The Anti-Recidivism Coalition strives to improve outcomes of formerly incarcerated individuals and build healthier communities. ARC is a support network and advocate for fair and just policy.
  8. @NCJFCJ: The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges works to ensure justice for every family and every child in every court throughout this country.
  9. @VeraInstitute: The Vera Institute of Justice focuses on making justice systems fairer and more effective through research and innovation.
  10. @CourtInnovation: Center for Court Innovation is a nonprofit that helps courts and criminal justice agencies aid victims, reduce crime, and improve public trust in justice.

And don’t forget to follow Reclaiming Futures!

OJJDP and NIJ Release New Bulletin in Justice Research Series; and more – News Roundup

by LJ Hernandez

News-oldTV-smlJuvenile Justice Reform

  • OJJDP and NIJ Release New Bulletin in Justice Research Series (U.S Department of Justice)  OJJDP and the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) have jointly released “Changing Lives: Prevention and Intervention to Reduce Serious Offending,” part of the Justice Research series. This bulletin reviews effective programs that mitigate risk factors for delinquency and crime among juveniles and young adults to prevent future serious criminal behavior. These programs are grouped by family, school, peers and community, individual, and employment. This bulletin summarizes the final report from the NIJ Study Group on the Transitions From Juvenile Delinquency and Adult Crime.

  • Savannah-Chatham Police Partnering With State To Search For Signs Of Gangs (GPB.org) Savannah-Chatham police are joining forces with gang experts from the State of Georgia to assess possible gang-related activity in the city.

Jobs, Grants, Events and Webinars

  • Please share the Reclaiming Futures Opportunity Board with your colleagues in the juvenile justice, adolescent substance abuse and teen mental health areas. It’s free to browse and post!

Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment and Mental Health

  • Physical Fitness Helps Young Adolescents Avert Depression (Science World Report) The researchers at the University of North Texas conducted a survey on 437 students from six middle schools in a metropolitan county in North Texas. Out of the total, 55 percent were girls. Based on the survey, they found that physically-fit sixth-graders were less likely to report feeling depressed on being promoted to the seventh grade.
  • Addiction and Health Consequences Increase as Synthetic Marijuana Use Grows (Marketwired.com) A growing and concerning number of individuals are seeking help for the effects of synthetic marijuana, also more commonly known as “K2″. Once marketed as providing a “legal high,” synthetic marijuana underwent a national ban in July of 2012. According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, between January and June of this year, 795 cases of synthetic marijuana exposures have already been reported to poison centers. Overall, the ban has reduced the number of incidents reported, but as the drug appears in certain regions like Illinois, health consequences are experienced in the community.

Watch: PBS Documentary “15 to Life”

by Susan Richardson

A new PBS Documentary “15 to Life” takes a close look at one man’s story to combat his life sentence after being convicted at age 15. Though Kenneth Young was convicted more than a decade ago for armed robbery, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled four years ago that a life in prison sentence without parole for a juvenile offender in a non-homicide case was unconstitutional.

The documentary follows Young’s journey to secure a resentencing under the Supreme Court ruling, addressing along the way his developments in maturity and education gained in prison.

“I’m not sure if Kenneth Young knew the consequences, quite frankly, at that time. At that age, they really don’t,” explains interviewee and chief of the Pinellas County sheriff’s office.

Not only does the story bring to light current issues around juvenile courts and impact on life sentences, it reinforces the need to provide treatment services and community support to at-risk youths early on to prevent more stories like Young’s.

Watch the documentary and share your thoughts below.